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A Statement of Solidarity and Support from St. Vincent Charity Medical Center

By Maureen Nagg on 
Posted on June 6, 2020

A Statement of Solidarity and Support from St. Vincent Charity Medical Center

On behalf of Janice G. Murphy, MSN, FACHE, President & CEO; Shannan D. Ritchie, FACHE, Chief Operating Officer and the leadership team at St. Vincent Charity Medical Center

We at St. Vincent Charity Medical Center stand in support of – and solidarity with – a community in pain.

We have witnessed too many senseless acts of violence and discrimination against Black Americans and we acknowledge the deep grief and anger now being expressed. Too frequently, such violence brings more violence, which overshadows the deep, underlying issues that have led to resentment and anger.

As a Catholic hospital, St. Vincent Charity Medical Center is rooted in extending the healing ministry of Jesus. As caregivers, our actions and words reflect a deep respect for the dignity and value of all persons.

Implicit in these words is our obligation to continue to serve as a compassionate and healing presence for our community, including those who feel angry, frustrated and hopeless at this time.

We applaud Cleveland City Council on their action to declare racism as a public health crisis. Our mission calls us now to stand together with those peacefully working to have their voices heard. St. Vincent Charity Medical Center pledges to join the coalition of Greater Cleveland organizations that are committing collective resources to undo structural racism.

Now is the time for our community and our nation to come together to address the racial and ethnic inequalities that cast a shadow across our society. As a hospital, we will continue to work together to identify ways to recognize diversity and promote inclusion among our team, our patients and our community.

As we encourage and participate in honest conversation and empathetic listening to work through these troubling times, may the words of our Lord guide us and comfort us:

Blessed are the poor in spirit,

   for theirs is the Kingdom of Heaven.

Blessed are those who mourn,

   for they will be comforted.

Blessed are the meek,

   for they will inherit the Earth.

Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness,

   for they will be filled.

Blessed are the merciful,

   for they will be shown mercy.

Blessed are the pure in heart,

   for they will see God.

Blessed are the peacemakers,

   for they will be called children of God.

Blessed are those who are persecuted because of righteousness,

   for theirs is the Kingdom of Heaven.

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